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M I S S I O N     M A N A G E R S   
Scott Lever, Mission manager Mike Seibert, Mission manager Al Herrera, Mission manager
Scott Lever Mike Seibert Al Herrera
P R E V I O U S    M I S S I O N    M A N A G E R S
Matt Keuneke, Mission Manager Cindy Oda, Mission Manager Rich Morris, Mission Manager Bill Nelson, Mission manager
Matt Keuneke Cindy Oda Richard Morris Bill Nelson
Byron Jones, Mission Manager Mark Adler, Mission Manager Leo Bister, Mission manager Beth Dewell, Mission Manager
Byron Jones Mark Adler Leo Bister Beth Dewell
Emily Eelkema, Mission Manager Jeff Favretto, Mission Manager Soina Ghandchi, Mission Manager Andy Mishkin, Mission Manager
Emily Eelkema Jeff Favretto Saina Ghandchi Andy Mishkin
Art Thompson, Mission Manager Rick Welch, Mission Manager Colette Lohr, Mission Manager Dan Gaines, Mission Manager
Art Thompson Rick Welch Colette Lohr Dan Gaines

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sols 3909-3914, January 22, 2015-January 27, 2015: Several Drives This Week Put Opportunity Near Marathon Distance

Opportunity is on the west rim of Endeavour Crater heading towards "Marathon Valley," a putative location for abundant clay minerals now about 984 feet (300 meters) away.

The project is operating the rover without using the Flash storage system to avoid reset problems and is using instead random access memory (RAM) for temporary storage of telemetry. The project is preparing to mask off the troubled sector of Flash and resume using the remainder of the Flash file system in normal operations.

Opportunity drove on Sols 3909, 3911 and 3914 (Jan. 22, Jan. 24 and Jan. 27, 2015), totaling almost 279 feet (85 meters). On the evening of Sol 3912 (Jan. 25, 2015), an atmospheric argon measurement was collected with the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer. Targeted color imagery is being collected as the rover makes progress towards the "Spirit of St. Louis" crater and Marathon Valley.

As of Sol 3914 (Jan. 27, 2015), the estimated solar array energy production was 534 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.891 and an inferred solar array dust factor of 0.636.

Total odometry is 26.02 miles (41.88 kilometers).




sols 3902-3908, January 14, 2015-January 21, 2015: Team Has Plan to Fix Flash Memory Issue

Opportunity is on the west rim of Endeavour Crater heading towards "Marathon Valley," a putative location for abundant clay minerals now less than 1,312 feet (400 meters) to the south.

The Flash memory degradation causes multiple resets of the rover on each wake-up. To mitigate this, the project is operating the rover without using the non-volatile Flash storage system, and using instead the volatile random access memory (RAM) for temporary storage of telemetry. Recently, the project was able to configure the rover to use this mode at every wakeup without the need to set this mode each time with a ground command.

Meanwhile, the project is preparing to mask off the troubled sector of Flash and resume using the remainder of the Flash file system in normal operations. The plan to implement the masking was reviewed last week by an independent panel and the project was given the go ahead.

Opportunity drove on Sols 3902, 3905 and 3908 (Jan. 14, Jan. 16 and Jan. 21, 2015), totaling over 574 feet (175 meters).

As of Sol 3908 (Jan. 21, 2015), the solar array energy production was 440 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 1.037 and a solar array dust factor of 0.596 (from Sol 3906/Jan. 18, 2015).

Total odometry is 25.97 miles (41.80 kilometers).




sols 3895-3901, January 7, 2015-January 13, 2015: Team Working on Strategy to Fix Flash Memory Issue

Opportunity is on the west rim of Endeavour Crater heading towards "Marathon Valley," a putative location for abundant clay minerals now less than 1,969 feet (600 meters) to the south.

The Flash memory degradation is causing multiple resets of the rover on each wake-up. To mitigate this, the project is operating the rover without using the non-volatile Flash storage system, and using instead the volatile random access memory (RAM) for temporary storage of telemetry. This requires real-time commanding the rover on the first day (sol) of each plan.

Meanwhile, the project has developed the strategy to mask off the troubled sector of Flash and resume using the remainder of the Flash file system in normal operations. The project plans to implement the masking after an independent review is held later this week.

Using RAM storage, Opportunity drove on Sol 3895 (Jan. 7, 2015), to do a small turn in place. Since arriving on the summit of "Cape Tribulation" on Sol 3894 (Jan. 6, 2015), Opportunity has been collecting a full color, 360-degree Panoramic Camera (Pancam) panorama.

As of Sol 3901 (Jan. 13, 2015), the solar array energy production was 395 watt-hours, an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 1.056 and a solar array dust factor of 0.606.

Total odometry is 25.86 miles (41.62 kilometers).




sols 3875-3894, December 18, 2014 - January 6, 2015: Rover Reaches the Summit of 'Cape Tribulation' After Several Drives this Week

Opportunity is on the west rim of Endeavour Crater heading towards "Marathon Valley," a putative location for abundant clay minerals now only about 1,969 feet (600 meters) to the south.

The Flash memory continues to degrade causing multiple resets of the rover on each wake-up. To mitigate this, the project is operating the rover without using the non-volatile Flash storage system, and instead relies on the volatile random access memory (RAM) for temporary storage of telemetry. This requires real-time commanding the rover on the first sol of each plan. Meanwhile, the project is developing a strategy to mask off the troubled sector of Flash and resume using the remainder of the Flash file system in normal operations.

Using RAM storage, Opportunity drove on Sols 3875, 3881, 3893 and 3894 (Dec. 18, 24, 2014 and Jan. 5 and Jan. 6, 2015), totaling over 656 feet (200 meters). With the drive on Sol 3894 (Jan. 6, 2015), Opportunity is now on the summit of "Cape Tribulation," the highest point so far on the western rim of Endeavour Crater. This point is 443 feet (135 meters) above the plain of "Botany Bay" before the rover started climbing the rim.

As of Sol 3894 (Jan. 6, 2015), the solar array energy production was 438 watt-hours, an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 1.041 and a solar array dust factor of 0.631.

Total odometry is 25.86 miles (41.62 kilometers).


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