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Video Archive

Below is the MRO Video Archive


2013 & 2014
Simulated Flyover of Mars Canyon Map

Simulated Flyover of Mars Canyon Map - December 12, 2014

This animation simulates a flyover of a portion of a Martian canyon detailed in a geological map produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and based on observations by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

The map shows the structure and geology of a western portion of Mars' Candor Chasma, one of the largest canyons within the longest canyon system in the solar system, Valles Marineris. The landforms include a series of hills called Candor Colles. The notations on the image are explained in the legend with the full map, at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3309/ .

The geological analysis presented in this USGS mapping indicates that the canyon once held lakes, which filled with sediments. Shaking of the sediments by "marsquakes" related to faults in the region produced the hilly landforms of Candor Colles.

The map is based on observations by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, one of six science instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona/USGS


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Mars-Flyby Comet in False Color

Mars-Flyby Comet in False Color - November 07, 2014

This movie sequence of images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) shows comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring before and after its close pass by Mars in October 2014. False color enhances subtle variations in brightness in the comet's coma. The images were obtained by MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera between October 17 and 20, 2014. For more information on these images and future updates, see http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu. HiRISE is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona


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Mars Orbiter Observes Comet Siding Spring

Mars Orbiter Observes Comet Siding Spring - November 07, 2014

This movie begins with an animation (artist's rendering) of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft above Mars. The scene zooms into an "X-ray" view of the spacecraft, revealing the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. The movie then transitions to a sequence of HiRISE images of the comet taken as it flew past Mars. The images were obtained by HiRISE between October 17 and 20, 2014. For more information on these images and future updates, see http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu. HiRISE is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona


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Comet Siding Spring: A Close Encounter with Mars

Comet Siding Spring: A Close Encounter with Mars - October 09, 2014

Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring will make a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19, 2014. At a distance of only 87,000 miles - about 1/3 the distance between the Earth and moon - it's a near miss of the Red Planet. Find out how NASA's Mars orbiters will evade dust from the comet.


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PDF: Transcript (21 Kb)
Animation of Comet Siding Springs' Close Encounter With Mars

Animation of Comet Siding Springs' Close Encounter With Mars - October 09, 2014

Comet Siding Spring C/2013 A1 will make a very close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19, 2014. NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data.


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Colliding Atmospheres: Mars vs Comet Siding Spring

Colliding Atmospheres: Mars vs Comet Siding Spring - August 06, 2014

Comet Siding Spring is about to fly historically close to Mars. The encounter could spark Martian auroras, a meteor shower, and other unpredictable effects. Whatever happens, NASA's fleet of Mars satellites will have a ringside seat.


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Mars Weathercam Helps Find Big, New Crater

Mars Weathercam Helps Find Big, New Crater - May 22, 2014

Scientists using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter found a fresh meteor-impact crater, and by golly it's big. It's the largest ever located anywhere by using before-and-after pictures.


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PDF: Transcript (14 Kb)
Dry Ice Moves on Mars

Dry Ice Moves on Mars - June 11, 2013

Is frozen carbon dioxide a key to features in some Martian gullies? To find out, scientists grabbed a bag of dry ice and took a road trip.

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Inspiring Students to Build Robots

Inspiring Students to Build Robots - April 04, 2013

Bobak Ferdowsi, Curiosity flight director, shares a special message with students on building robots.

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What Happens When the Sun Blocks our Signal?

What Happens When the Sun Blocks our Signal? - March 20, 2013

How can you communicate with Mars spacecraft when the Sun is in the way? Learn more about 'solar conjunction' in this 60-second video.

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Mars: Dry Ice and Dunes

Mars: Dry Ice and Dunes - January 24, 2013

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captures the springtime thaw of seasonal carbon dioxide ice on Mars.

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PDF: Transcript (12.68 KB)

2012
Mars' Whirling Dust Devil

Mars' Whirling Dust Devil - April 04, 2012

Animation of a skinny "dust devil" on the dust-covered Amazonis Planitia region of northern Mars.

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Storm Chaser on Mars

Storm Chaser on Mars - March 20, 2012

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Catches a Twister in Action.

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› Related news release

2011
Sleigh Ride Over Mars

Sleigh Ride Over Mars - December 20, 2011

Take a virtual sleigh ride over the real landscapes of Mars, courtesy of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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Possible Water Flows on Mars

Possible Water Flows on Mars - August 4, 2011

Mysterious features on slopes hint there could be water flows on Mars.

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2009
screen shot from movie 'Mars Exposed - How meteorites uncovered a Martian secret'
Mars Exposed - September 24, 2009

How meteorites uncovered a Martian secret.

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screen shot from movie 'Looking at Landing Sites for the Mars Science Laboratory - May 27, 2009'
Looking at Landing Sites for the Mars Science Laboratory - May 27, 2009

The prime responsibility of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been to search out new landing sites for future missions.

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screen shot from movie 'Soaring Over Mars - May 27, 2009'
Soaring Over Mars - May 27, 2009

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has seen many places on the planet. One of the most interesting is one of the great canyon systems on Mars.


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screen shot from movie 'Weather Movie, Mars South Polar Region, March-April 2009 - Close'

screen shot from movie 'Weather Movie, Mars South Polar Region, March-April 2009 - Far'
Weather Movies, Mars South Polar Region, March-April 2009

These movies show the southern hemisphere of Mars from March 19 through April 14, 2009, a period when regional dust storms occurred along the retreating edge of carbon-dioxide frost in the seasonal south polar cap.

Each movie combines hundreds of images from the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS


Download Options with Full Caption

Related Press Release  |  

2008
Carbon-Dioxide Frost Settling from Seasonal Outbursts on Mars (Movie)
Peeling Back Layers of a Martian Polar Ice Cap

This artist's animation illustrates how NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter used radar to map the insides of the north polar ice cap on Mars.
The animation begins by showing the orbiter flying above the Red Planet. It then shows the orbiter shooting out beams of radio waves across a slice of the ice cap. The waves, which belong to the radio portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, penetrate through the ice and bounce back at different times depending on the differing concentrations of sand and dust in the ice.

The result is a glimpse inside the layers that make up the ice cap, as demonstrated by the next part of the movie. The ice cap slices open to reveal what the scientists found. Flashing green lights show some of the actual radar reflections, subsequently seen as dark lines delineating the layers. While the uppermost thin layers were observed before in camera images, the deeper layers have been discovered by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The movie ends by showing the radar image by itself.

These observations demonstrate that radar can be used to study the history of global climate on Mars by revealing the patterns of deep layering. They also expose a flat boundary between the ice cap and the surface of Mars, indicating that the outer strong shell of Mars must be thick enough to support the weight of the ice cap without sagging. This, in turn, suggests that the planet's outer shell, called the lithosphere, is colder than previously thought, with temperatures in the interior increasing gradually with depth. Any bodies of liquid water that might exist underneath Martian ground must therefore be deeper than previously calculated, where temperatures are warmer.

This artist's animation is based on data from the Shallow Radar instrument on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, as well as images from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor mission.

The Shallow Radar instrument was provided by the Italian Space Agency. Its operations are led by the University of Rome and its data are analyzed by a joint U.S.-Italian science team. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Rome/SwRI


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2007
Screenshot from the movie 'Seeing Mars Better Than Ever' Seeing Mars Better Than Ever - October 17, 2006

NASA's newest Mars spacecraft, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, is providing an unprecedented view of the surface of Mars.

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QuickTime with Caption 7.5 MB

2006
In this animation, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, set against the black of space and the muted orange of Mars, rotates to get into position for imaging. As the craft turns, the point of view zooms toward the instrument deck, where the viewer gets a close-up view of the context imager. Then, a rectangular strip of the planet is highlighted, indicating the area that the context imager first imaged. The remainder of the animation is a pan down the entire first context image (black and white), which features many large and small craters. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Imager Instrument Pointing Simulation - May 01, 2006

This animation highlights the orbiter's context imager as it took and returned its first image.

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In this animation, a section of Mars is highlighted in a muted orange/brown. This section is the area on Mars where the HiRISE camera first imaged. The viewer sees the entire, brilliant image as the viewpoint pans over the large area. Craters and other topographical features are seen very clearly - a hint at what the camera will be capable of doing once the orbiter is in its science orbit in the fall of 2006. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter First Images of Mars from HiRISE - May 01, 2006

This animation highlights the first images returned by the orbiter's HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiement) camera.

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In this animation, the boxy Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft is set against the black backdrop of space and the muted orange of Mars. As the frames progress, the orbiter turns (its solar panels looking like stiff, rectangular wings) to get into position to take images of the martian surface. The perspective then changes so the viewer is looking at the instrument deck and there is a zoom-in to see the HiRISE camera up close. The camera looks like a large, cylindrical tube. The view then changes as if the viewer is seeing Mars through the HiRISE camera. A large, square area of the surface is highlighted and meant to represent the companion camera's (the context imager) coverage. A smaller, gray rectangle presents what HiRISE sees. The view zooms in on the gray area and shows the amazing surface detail that HiRISE allows. The view pans over many interesting craters and other surface features, ultimately ending on a stunning medium-sized crater. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Instrument Pointing Simulation - May 01, 2006

In order to wow us with amazing new views of the Red Planet, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter must be able to rotate its instrument deck to face its target. This animation features the spacecraft moving to get into position for optimal martian snapshots!

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This animation begins with a close-up of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's boxy main bus, featuring the science deck where all of the instruments are housed. The view then zooms in even closer to the MARCI instrument itself. It is a small camera (compared to HiRISE) that has a lens at the end that resembles a small dust broom. That design allows the camera to image in wide swaths, covering large areas. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mars Color Imager Instrument Pointing Simulation - May 01, 2006

This animation highlights the first use of the MARCI (Mars Color Imager) camera on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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Screenshot from the animation 'Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Launch, Mars Orbit Insertion and Aerobraking Animation' Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Launch, Mars Orbit Insertion and Aerobraking Animation - March 09, 2006

Follow the journey of NASA's next generation Mars orbiter during its launch, through the vastness of space and as it reaches critical mission milestones. The spacecraft's powerful suite of instruments and their unprecedented capabilities are highlighted.

Part 1
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Part 2
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Complete Version
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QuickTime with Caption 20.9 MB
Screenshot from the movie 'A Mars Eye Opener' A Mars Eye Opener - March 06, 2006

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will see things at Mars in greater detail than ever before.

QuickTime with Caption 14.5 MB
Screenshot from the movie 'Next Leap in Mars Exploration' Next Leap in Mars Exploration - March 03, 2006

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will bring new capabilities to Mars exploration. The spacecraft arrives at Mars Mar. 10, 2006.

QuickTime with Caption 14.4 MB

2005
screenshot from the video 'Liftoff is Extraordinary' Liftoff is Extraordinary! - August 12, 2005

The Atlas V launch vehicle lit the morning sky as it rocketed the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on its journey to Mars.

RealPlayer with Caption
screenshot from the video 'Launch Coverage Introduction' Launch Coverage Introduction
- August 12, 2005

NASA commentator, George Diller, opens the MRO launch coverage program.

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Screenshot from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation - August 05, 2005
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Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Fall 2004 Update
- January 11, 2005

Less than a year before the launch of the largest spacecraft ever sent to Mars, engineers and technicians at Lockheed Martin were busily assembling the spacecraft while engineers and scientists at JPL were moving into their operations space.

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QuickTime with Caption 6.9 MB

2004
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation
Full Version
- June 07, 2004

Furthering our global perspective of Mars and its watery past, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is revealing the red planet as never before. After a seven-month cruise to Mars and six months of aerobraking to reach its science orbit, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's instruments have zoomed in for extreme close-up photography of the martian surface, analyzed minerals, looked for subsurface water, traced how much dust and water are distributed in the atmosphere, monitored daily global weather, and surveyed the surface for landing sites for future missions.

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Part 1: Launch to Orbit insertion Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation: Part 1
Launch to Orbit insertion
- June 07, 2004

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Part 2: Aerobraking to Mission Simulation and Objectives Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Animation: Part 2
Aerobraking to Mission Simulation and Objectives
- June 07, 2004

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Simulation of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Deploying its High-Gain Antenna Simulation of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Deploying its High-Gain Antenna - July 07, 2004

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Simulation of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Deploying its Solar Panels Simulation of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Deploying its Solar Panels - July 07, 2004

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The Challenges of Getting to Mars



Mars is right next door to Earth, but it isn't very neighborly. Two-thirds of all international missions have failed, but an undaunted human spirit and hard work keep us on a path to explore Mars - a world so much like our own,but much more hostile and uninviting. In this Challenges of Getting to Marsweb series, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter team members describe demanding mission stages associated with the largest vehicle to go to Mars since Viking in the 1970s. Chapters include: transporting the orbiter across the country, preparing it for its journey and conducting a successful launch. Future episodes will include the challenges of navigating the spacecraft, entering the martian atmosphere, slowing down to achieve the spacecraft's science orbit (aerobraking) and collecting vital, high-resolution Mars data.

Screenshot from the movie 'The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Dip and Drag' The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Dip and Drag - April 03, 2006
With the spacecraft safely captured into orbit, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter team transitions to the next critical phase -- aerobraking. Learn how engineers slow the spacecraft and precisely shape its orbit using the dynamic atmosphere of Mars.

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Screenshot from the movie 'The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Burn and Capture' The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Burn and Capture - March 07, 2006
After millions of miles, dozens of tests, a handful of calibrations and a number of "dress rehearsals," the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter arrives at the red planet on March 10, 2006. Find out how engineers prepare the spacecraft and themselves for this complicated engine burn and capture into Mars' orbit.

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Watch the movie 'Challenges of Getting to Mars: Hitting the Bull's-Eye' The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Hitting the Bull's-Eye - February 24, 2006
Hitting a moving target over 306 million miles away is no easy feat. Learn how JPL navigation engineers have guided the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter toward its mission-critical capture into orbit around the red planet.

QuickTime 8.9 MB  |   MPEG 11.5 MB  |   MPEG-4 8.6 MB  |   QuickTime with Caption 8.9 MB
Watch the movie 'The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Launch Logistics' The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Launch Logistics - October 12, 2005
The logistical challenge of getting a mission sent to Mars begins years before liftoff and culminates in the stressful days just prior to launch. This video highlights teams at JPL, Kennedy Space Center and Lockheed Martin working together to prepare for a complex launch amid the ever-changing weather of August in Florida.

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Watch the movie 'The Challenges of Getting to Mars - Getting to the Launch Pad' The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Getting to the Launch Pad - August 5, 2005
From one side of the country to the other, through a snowstorm and other delays, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter made its way to Kennedy Space Center in Florida for final processing and rehearsals before launch. Hitch a ride on the C-17 cargo plane that carried the next generation of Mars explorers to its final Earth-bound destination.

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Watch the movie 'The Challenges of Getting to Mars - Heavy Lifting' The Challenges of Getting to Mars: Heavy Lifting - April 18, 2005
Getting a spacecraft to Mars is no walk in the park - as launch engineers are well aware. But when the spacecraft in question is among the largest ever sent to the red planet, there are specific challenges that must be overcome. Hear from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter team just what it will take to get the mission on its way.

QuickTime 8.7 MB  |   MPEG 8.2 MB  |   MPEG-4 7.7 MB  |   QuickTime with Caption 8.8 MB

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