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Spotlight
read the article 'Storm-Chasing Orbiter Tracks Martian Weather'
December 18, 2008

Like storm chasers on Earth, a NASA spacecraft spends time each day pursuing intense weather on Mars. Speeding along in orbit, it takes images of dust storms. Often, the storms are spiral like giant tornadoes on Earth.
read the article 'Storm-Chasing Orbiter Tracks Martian Weather' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'Seasonal Freezing and Thawing on Mars'
November 25, 2008

On Mars, the stuff we know as "dry ice," or frozen carbon dioxide, is a powerful agent for change. In winter, it forms a polar ice cap. In spring, it becomes an expanding gas that carves channels in the surface and sends loose debris into landslides.
read the article 'Seasonal Freezing and Thawing on Mars' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'Gemstone of the Year'
November 6, 2008

Opal is the gemstone for those born in the month of October, but Mars scientists may claim it as the treasure of 2008. Inside the largest canyon in the whole solar system, opal minerals stretch in a pinkish cream swath, just to the right of a crater filled with dunes.
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Spotlight
read the article 'How to Explore Mars: Get There Safely!'
September 2, 2008

Like space shuttle pilots, Mars navigators need to know what the atmosphere will be like during landing. When Phoenix arrived, it barely missed a dust storm. Now scientists are evaluating what conditions may be like when the Mars Science Laboratory rover arrives in two years. That's one Mars year, or one change of seasons.
read the article 'How to Explore Mars: Get There Safely!' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'A Tribute to Mars Exploration'
August 28, 2008

As Americans celebrate Labor Day 2008, six flags stand in silent salute to the U.S. workforce on Mars. Three of the flags are on spacecraft still exploring Mars.
read the article 'A Tribute to Mars Exploration' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'Rivers Ran Through It'
July 28, 2008

Lakes and rivers with the potential to support life covered much of ancient Mars. Those areas where water deposited clay minerals would be good places to search for signs of past life.
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Spotlight
read the article 'The Perfect Weather Forecast'
June 19, 2008

Let's say you live in Miami. If Earth's weather were as predictable as Mars' weather, you could expect a hurricane similar in magnitude to hit Miami year after year, within about two weeks of the same date.
read the article 'The Perfect Weather Forecast' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'Getting By with a Little Help from Friends'
May 23, 2008

When NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander prepares for landing on May 25, 2008, it won't be alone. Three spacecraft in orbit will serve as a welcome committee.
read the article 'Getting By with a Little Help from Friends' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'Images of Phobos'
April 9, 2008

The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took these images of the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, on March 23, 2008.
read the article 'Images of Phobos' Read More
Spotlight
read the article 'The Incredible Mars Telescope'
March 10, 2008

Imagine having a backyard telescope so powerful you could easily see details on another planet. NASA has such an instrument at Mars and recently pointed it at Earth!
read the article 'The Incredible Mars Telescope' Read More

Related Information

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What does it take to get a spacecraft from Earth all the way to Mars? There are a few key things to consider, as explained in this 60-second video from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
Mars in a Minute: How Do You Get to Mars?
What does it take to get a spacecraft from Earth all the way to Mars? There are a few key things to consider, as explained in this 60-second video from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
› Watch Video
At the center of this view of an area of mid-latitude northern Mars, a fresh crater about 6 meters (20 feet) in diameter holds an exposure of bright material, blue in this false-color image.
Exposed Ice in a Fresh Crater
At the center of this view of an area of mid-latitude northern Mars, a fresh crater about 6 meters (20 feet) in diameter holds an exposure of bright material, blue in this false-color image.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona




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