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sand dune, mars rover, wheel, Dumont, Scarecrow, test - This image shows a sweeping view of Dumont Dunes in California's Mojave Desert, near Death Valley. One giant dune is pictured in the middle, casting a dark shadow over part of itself.
Sandy Dunes
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sand dune, mars rover, wheel, Dumont, Scarecrow, test - The image shows a sweeping view of desert sand dunes with two engineers walking in the distance.
Mars on Earth
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sand dune, mars rover, wheel, Dumont, Scarecrow, test - Several engineers flank the Scarecrow mobility rover on both sides as the rover drives over a sand dunes obstacle course.
Driving Over Sandy Ripples
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sand dune, mars rover, wheel, Dumont, Scarecrow, test - This image shows the scarecrow test rover going over a dunes obstacle course, while an engineer hunches down to see the wheels as it drives.
Scarecrow Rover Desert Tests
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sand dune, mars rover, wheel, Dumont, Scarecrow, test - Several engineers watch as the Scarecrow test rover goes over a dunes obstacle course.
Dunes Obstacle Course
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mars rover, desert, dune, test, Scarecrow - Waiting on the sand for its test drive to support Mars rover Curiosity is the car-size Scarecrow rover.
Curiosity's Stunt Double
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wheel, test, Scarecrow, Mars rover Rover wheels on Scarecrow with chevron-shaped treads rest on sand in Dumont dunes.
Scarecrow Rover Wheel Closeup
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sand dune, mars rover, wheel, Dumont, Scarecrow, test - This image shows a row of uphill, white sand dunes that JPL engineers shape with long rakes for desert rover test, under blue skies. The Scarecrow rover sits at the bottom, waiting to be tested.
Replicating Martian Dunes
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This image shows the tower from which the test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) will hang before a balloon lifts it to high altitudes.
Launch Tower for LDSD
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Members of the team for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) stand in front of the project's saucer-shaped test vehicle at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.
LDSD Team in Hawaii
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This artist's concept shows the test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions.
LDSD's Rocket-powered Test Vehicle
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Engineers unload ground support equipment for a June engineering test flight above Kauai, Hawaii.
LDSD Test Device Arrives in Hawaii
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Engineers unload ground support equipment for a June engineering test flight above Kauai, Hawaii.
LDSD Test Device Arrives in Hawaii
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This April 6, 2014, image from the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was taken as a follow-up to discovery of a possible 2012 impact scar in images from the orbiter's Mars Color Imager. It reveals two craters within the darkened area (at center of the inscribed rectangle).
Fresh Mars Crater Confirmed Within Impact Scar
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This March 20, 2014, image from the MARCI camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has a dark spot (at center of inscribed rectangle) noticed while the image was being examined for a weather report. Other observations confirmed that the spot is a scar from a space rock hitting Mars in 2012.
Impact Scar Detected in Mars Weathercam Image (Unannotated)
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These images from the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter were taken before and after an apparent impact scar appeared in the area in March 2012. Comparing the Jan. 16, 2012, image (left) with the April 6, 2014, one (right) confirms that fresh craters appeared during the interval.
Before-and-After Views Confirm Fresh Craters
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This April 6, 2014, image from the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was taken as a follow-up to discovery of a possible 2012 impact scar in images from the orbiter's Mars Color Imager. It reveals two craters within the darkened area (at center of the inscribed rectangle).
Fresh Mars Crater Confirmed Within Impact Scar
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This March 20, 2014, image from the MARCI camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has a dark spot (at center of inscribed rectangle) noticed while the image was being examined for a weather report. Other observations confirmed that the spot is a scar from a space rock hitting Mars in 2012.
Impact Scar Detected in Mars Weathercam Image
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This April 6, 2014, image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows numerous landslides in the vicinity of where an impact crater was excavated in March 2012.
Landslides Near Fresh Crater on Mars
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The largest crater associated with a March 2012 impact on Mars has many smaller craters around it, revealed in this image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Large, Fresh Crater Surrounded by Smaller Craters
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This pair of images taken one day apart by the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) weather camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals when an asteroid impact made the scar seen in the right-hand image. The left image was taken during Martian afternoon on March 27, 2012; the right one on the afternoon of March 28, 2012.
Best-Ever Pinning Down When a Space Rock Hit Mars
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The launch tower helps link the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes.
Engineers Ready Supersonic Decelerator
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Component images for this stereo, 360-degree scene were taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity after a drive of about 97 feet southeastward on April 22, 2014. This vista of the rim of Endeavour Crater appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses.
Opportunity's Tracks Near Crater Rim Ridgeline (Stereo)
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The component images for this 360-degree panorama were taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity after the rover drove about 97 feet southeastward on April 22, 2014. The location is on the western rim of Endeavour Crater. The two parallel tracks are 3.3 feet apart.
Opportunity's Tracks Near Crater Rim Ridgeline
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NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera on May 10, 2014, to capture this stereo, 360-degree view near the ridgeline of Endeavour Crater's western rim. The center is southeastward. The view appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses.
Approaching a Target Deposit on Mars Crater Rim (Stereo)
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