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MAVEN was launched into a Hohmann Transfer Orbit with periapsis at Earth's orbit and apoapsis at the distance of the orbit of Mars. The spacecraft will travel more than 180 degrees around the Sun in its transfer orbit, which requires 10 months to set the stage for Mars Orbit Insertion in September 2014.
Hohmann Transfer Orbit
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This stereo view combining images taken on Feb. 10, 2014, by the Navigation Camera (Navcam) on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover looks back to where the rover crossed a dune at "Dingo Gap" four days earlier. It appears three dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.
Panoramic View From West of 'Dingo Gap' (Stereo)
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This panorama combining images taken on Feb. 10, 2014, by the Navigation Camera (Navcam) on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover looks back to where the rover crossed a dune at "Dingo Gap" four days earlier. The view is centered toward the east and spans about 225 degrees.
Panoramic View From West of 'Dingo Gap'
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NASA's Curiosity Mars rover used its Navigation Camera (Navcam) for this look back after finishing a long drive on Feb. 19, 2014. The rows of rocks just to the right of the fresh wheel tracks in this view are an outcrop called "Junda." This view is looking toward the east-northeast.
Curiosity's View Back After Passing 'Junda' Striations
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A stereo landscape scene from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows rock rows at "Junda" forming striations in the foreground, with Mount Sharp on the horizon. The image appears three dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.
Martian Landscape With Rock Rows and Mount Sharp (Stereo)
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A landscape scene from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows rock rows at "Junda" forming striations in the foreground, with Mount Sharp on the horizon. The component images were taken by the rover's Navigation Camera (Navcam), looking southward, during a pause in driving on Feb. 19.
Martian Landscape With Rock Rows and Mount Sharp
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The "Block Island" meteorite 3D model, reproduced at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
3D Model of the 'Block Island' Meteorite
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This map shows the route driven and route planned for NASA's Curiosity Mars rover from before reaching "Dingo Gap."
Map of Recent and Planned Driving by Curiosity as of Feb. 18, 2014
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This look back at a dune that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover drove across was taken by the rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam) during the 538th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars (Feb. 9, 2014).
Curiosity's Color View of Martian Dune After Crossing It (Raw Color)
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NASA's Curiosity Mars rover caught its own shadow in this image taken just after completing a drive of 329 feet (100.3 meters) on the 547th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Feb. 18, 2014).
Curiosity Mars Rover's Shadow After Long Backward Drive
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This look back at a dune that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover drove across was taken by the rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam) during the 538th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars (Feb. 9, 2014).
Curiosity's Color View of Martian Dune After Crossing It
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The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter caught this view of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on Feb. 14, 2014.
Opportunity Rover on 'Murray Ridge' Seen From Orbit (Unannotated)
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The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter caught this view of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on Feb. 14, 2014.
Opportunity Rover on 'Murray Ridge' Seen From Orbit (Annotated)
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The boulder-studded ridge in this scene recorded by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is "McClure-Beverlin Escarpment," informally named for Jack Beverlin and Bill McClure, engineers who on Feb. 14, 1969, risked their lives to save NASA's second successful Mars mission, Mariner 6, on its launch pad.
Opportunity's Southward View of 'McClure-Beverlin Escarpment' on Mars (True Color)
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The boulder-studded ridge in this scene recorded by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is "McClure-Beverlin Escarpment," informally named for Jack Beverlin and Bill McClure, engineers who on Feb. 14, 1969, risked their lives to save NASA's second successful Mars mission, Mariner 6, on its launch pad.
Opportunity's Southward View of 'McClure-Beverlin Escarpment' on Mars (Stereo)
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The boulder-studded ridge in this scene recorded by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is "McClure-Beverlin Escarpment," informally named for Jack Beverlin and Bill McClure, engineers who on Feb. 14, 1969, risked their lives to save NASA's second successful Mars mission, Mariner 6, on its launch pad.
Opportunity's Southward View of 'McClure-Beverlin Escarpment' on Mars (False Color)
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This image from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the location of a rock called "Pinnacle Island" before it appeared in front of the rover in early January 2014.
Where Martian 'Jelly Doughnut' Rock Came From (True Color)
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This image from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows where a rock called "Pinnacle Island" had been before it appeared in front of the rover in early January 2014.
Where Martian 'Jelly Doughnut' Rock Came From (Stereo)
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This image from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows where a rock called "Pinnacle Island" had been before it appeared in front of the rover in early January 2014.
Where Martian 'Jelly Doughnut' Rock Came From (False Color)
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No NASA Mars orbiter has been in a position to observe morning daylight on Mars since the twin Viking orbiters of the 1970s.
Martian Morning Clouds Seen by Viking Orbiter 1 in 1976
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The series of nine images making up this animation were taken by the rear Hazard-Avoidance Camera (rear Hazcam) on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover as the rover drove over a dune spanning "Dingo Gap" on Mars.
Movie of Curiosity's View Backwards While Crossing Dune
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ASA's Curiosity Mars rover used the Navigation Camera (Navcam) on its mast to catch this look-back eastward at wheel tracks from driving through and past "Dingo Gap" inside Gale Crater.
Curiosity Making Headway West of 'Dingo Gap'
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This image combines a photograph of seasonal dark flows on a Martian slope with a grid of colors based on data collected by a mineral-mapping spectrometer observing the same area.
Color-Coded Clues to Composition Superimposed on Martian Seasonal-Flow Image
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Dark, seasonal flows emanate from bedrock exposures at Palikir Crater on Mars in this image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Warm-Season Flows on Martian Slope
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This view of the twilight sky and Martian horizon taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover includes Earth as the brightest point of light in the night sky
Bright 'Evening Star' Seen from Mars is Earth (Annotated)
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