Follow this link to skip to the main content
National Aeronautics and Space Administration vertical gray line
+ NASA Homepage
 
NASA's Mars Exploration Program
+ Mars Home
Zip Code Mars
Summary
Zip Code Mars Contribution
horizontal gray line

Photo of Essam Heggy
   Essam Heggy
   Scientist
Lunar and Planetary Institute
Houston, Texas
United States Of America

Background Information
My research work involves mapping subsurface hydrological and geological structures in planetary arid and cold-climate environments using radar imaging and sounding techniques. The study covers two potential applications. The first is to evaluate the potential of low-frequency orbital sounding and ground-penetrating radars to map the possible presence of Martian subsurface hydrological features, such as local water lenses or aquifer systems. The approach includes electromagnetic characterization of Martian-like materials,materials; numerical simulations of wave propagation in geo-electrical models, GPR field surveys, and comparative planetology studies. The second main point of interest concern the use of radar techniques to explore heavily eroded and dust covered geological feature in order to trace large-scale subsurface stratigraphy and structures. This includes the mapping of impact craters, paleo-hydrological drainage networks and volcanic features such as rifts, lava tubes and flows.

The basic elements of this research can be summarized by the following:

-Electromagnetic characterization of Martian-soil analogues -Mars Ground Penetrating Radar analogue studies -Numerical simulation of the wave-soil interaction

Contributions to Mars Exploration

My research work involves mapping and sounding subsurface hydrological and geological structures in a planetary arid context using radar imaging and probing techniques. I am mainly interested in two potential applications. [more contributions ...]
Personal Reflections

content image for personal reflections section Ground Penetrating Radar fieldwork on the Sahara and the Amargoza desert as potential Mars analogues. [more personal reflections ...]


USAGov NASA