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Press Release Images: Opportunity
23-Mar-2015
NASA Reformats Memory of Longest-Running Mars Rover
Press Release
This view from NASA's Opportunity Mars rover shows part of 'Marathon Valley,' a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley. It was taken by the rover's Pancam on March 13, 2015. This version is in approximate true color.
Mars 'Marathon Valley' Overlook

This view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows part of "Marathon Valley," a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley. 

The scene spans from east, at left, to southeast. It combines four pointings of the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) on March 13, 2015, during the 3,958th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. 

The rover team selected Marathon Valley as a science destination because observations of this location using the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter yielded evidence of clay minerals, a clue to ancient wet environments. By the time Opportunity explores Marathon Valley, the rover will have exceeded a total driving distance equivalent to an Olympic marathon. Opportunity has been exploring the Meridiani Planum region of Mars since January 2004.

This version of the image is presented in approximate true color by combining exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters at each of the four camera pointings, using filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). 

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.  

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This view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows part of 'Marathon Valley,' a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley.
Mars 'Marathon Valley' Overlook (False Color)

This view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows part of "Marathon Valley," a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley. 

In this version of the image, the landscape is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more easily visible.

The scene spans from east, at left, to southeast. It combines four pointings of the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) on March 13, 2015, during the 3,958th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. 

The rover team selected Marathon Valley as a science destination because observations of this location using the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter yielded evidence of clay minerals, a clue to ancient wet environments. By the time Opportunity explores Marathon Valley, the rover will have exceeded a total driving distance equivalent to an Olympic marathon. Opportunity has been exploring the Meridiani Planum region of Mars since January 2004.

The image combines exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters at each of the four camera pointings, using filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). 

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.  


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This stereo scene from NASA's Opportunity Mars rover shows part of 'Marathon Valley' as seen from an overlook north of the valley on March 13, 2015. The image combines views from the left eye and right eye of Opportunity's Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses
Mars 'Marathon Valley' Overlook, in Stereo

This stereo scene from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows part of "Marathon Valley," a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley. 

The image combines views from the left eye and right eye of Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses with the red lens on the left. The component Pancam images were taken on March 13, 2015, during the 3,958th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. The scene spans from east, at left, to southeast. 

The rover team selected Marathon Valley as a science destination because observations of this location using the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter yielded evidence of clay minerals, a clue to ancient wet environments. By the time Opportunity explores Marathon Valley, the rover will have exceeded a total driving distance equivalent to an Olympic marathon. Opportunity has been exploring the Meridiani Planum region of Mars since January 2004. 

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.  


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This map updates progress that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is making toward reaching a driving distance equivalent to a marathon footrace. It indicates the rover's position on March 23, 2015, relative to where it could surpass that distance.
Rover's Progress Toward Mars Marathon, Sol 3966

This map updates progress that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is making toward reaching a driving distance equivalent to a marathon footrace. It indicates the rover's position on March 23, 2015, relative to where it could surpass that distance.

North is up. The southern end of the blue traverse line marks the rover's location after completion of a drive on March 21, 2015, during the 3,966th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. The Sol 3966 drive covered about 59 yards (54 meters).

For comparison, a map at http://mars.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/?ImageID=6950 shows Opportunity's location as of Feb. 10, 2015.

At the Sol 3966 location, Opportunity is within 47 yards (43 meters) of surpassing the official Olympic marathon-race distance of 26.219 miles (42.195 kilometers). 

The base map is an image product from High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. 

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona


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