Curiosity Mission Updates

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mast Camera (Mastcam) on Sol 2437 Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity's most recent transmission didn't come down as expected, so our plan today is to command the rover to retransmit its latest data. That includes where it ended up after its drive this weekend. We still spent the morning planning. Because we were missing key data about exactly where Curiosity is, we could not implement our planned MAHLI and APXS analyses. Rather, we focused on "untargeted" observations, which don't require knowing Curiosity's exact location. The team planned regular weather observations, a survey of the sky at twilight, a movie looking for dust devils and a second one looking up at the clouds. We also planned a 360° Mastcam image to capture the regional outcrops as well as three ChemCam AEGIS analyses, where the instrument automatically selects targets within a region defined by the team. We also asked Curiosity to retransmit detailed location and image data so that we can plan our contact science tomorrow. The outcrop in front of us is spectacular - we should be right in front of the rocks shown in the image above!


About this Blog
These blog updates are provided by self-selected Mars Science Laboratory mission team members who love to share what Curiosity is doing with the public.

Dates of planned rover activities described in these reports are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

Contributors
Tools on the
Curiosity Rover
The Curiosity rover has tools to study clues about past and present environmental conditions on Mars, including whether conditions have ever been favorable for microbial life. The rover carries:

Cameras

Spectrometers

Radiation Detectors

Environmental Sensors

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