This image acquired on January 24, 2019 by NASAs Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows Cerberus Fossae, a steep-sided set of troughs cutting volcanic plains to the east of Elysium Mons.

April 16, 2019

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Cerberus Fossae is a steep-sided set of troughs cutting volcanic plains to the east of Elysium Mons. Steep slopes on Mars have active landslides (also called "mass wasting"), and here we see evidence for two types of activity.

First, the light bluish boulders on the slope appear to originate at a layer of bedrock (also light blue) near the top of the section. Second, the dark thin lines are recurring slope lineae, probably also due to mass wasting, but composed of finer-grained materials.

The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. (The original image scale is 28.1 centimeters [11.1 inches] per pixel [with 1 x 1 binning]; objects on the order of 84 centimeters [33.1 inches] across are resolved.) North is up.

The University of Arizona, in Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., in Boulder, Colorado. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Credit

NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

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